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“Break the wineglass, and fall towards the glassblower’s breath” ~ A ‘Flash Choir’ Sings Philip Glass In Times Square

I’m not that big a fan of Philip Glass’ minimalist music, which he calls “music with repetitive structure“,  but,  this is really interesting!  I love the words by Jalaluddin Rumi.  To honor his 75th birthday,  NPR commissioned Glass to create this work, which was performed in Times Square New York on July 10th.  The lyrics are:

There’s an old rule that drunks have to argue
and get into fights.
The lover is just as bad. He falls down a hole.
But down in that hole he finds something shining,
worth more than any amount of money or power.

Last night the moon came
dropping its clothes in the street.
I took it as a sign to start singing.
Falling up into the bowl of sky.
The bowl brakes. Everywhere is falling everywhere.
Nothing else to do.

Here’s the new rule: break the wineglass.
And fall toward the glassblower’s breath.

According to the NPR article:

For his text, Glass selected words from the medieval Sufi Muslim poet Jalaluddin Rumi, as translated by Coleman Barks. In his poetry, Rumi urges the reader to break free of the constraints of daily life — to upend expectations and jettison traditional thinking in an unending quest to unite with the divine. “Here’s the new rule,” Rumi wrote. “Break the wineglass, and fall towards the glassblower’s breath.” And somehow — beautifully, magically and only briefly — this fleeting chorus became the heartbeat of Times Square.”

A ‘Flash Choir’ Sings Philip Glass In Times Square : NPR.

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